While I was absent

Over much of the last year I was taking a hiatus from blogging, as some out there know. Some people asked me why I absented myself, and I suppose some will also ask why I am resuming blogging. I suppose it's because I can't not blog, seeing what is going on in the world. This is in a sense a catharsis for me, and yet it is not always rewarding: more often it's frustrating and exasperating. By nature I am something of a contrarian and a maverick, not being easily swayed by popular opinion or the crowd. So I feel out of step with the consensus. Still I feel a compulsion to put my thoughts out there, whether they are accepted or rejected or just ignored.

For some months after I stopped blogging I avoided all politically-oriented web sites, and followed the news only through Roku and word-of-mouth from people around me. Sometimes I get so fed up with the news cycle and the depressing nature of the events of the day -- and the indifference of the jaded masses. It seems at times as though all is lost, and there are certainly plenty of people on our side who are doomsayers. Despite what some see as 'negativity' on my part I am an irrepressible optimist. Bad as things may be, I have a certain serenity that it will all work out in the end.

So have I changed my views since taking my long break? How do I 'fit in' to this ''Dark Enlightenment'' or 'Neo-reaction" group? Maybe I don't. Maybe I can't fit the existing categories, and I don't mind that. If pressed, I would probably say I am a reactionary and an ethnonationalist/ethnopatriot. I believe that those of us who have colonial-era ancestry constitute a distinct people. Now it's the fashion to adopt the leftist trope that 'we are a mongrel people with no culture or heritage.' I reject that idea and it comes straight from leftist propaganda. The 'new America', the ''fundamentally transformed America" may indeed fit that description but not the America into which I was born. That's the 'America' that I call the changeling America, the impostor America. Don't be confused by the propaganda; the old America still lives as long as there are still 'old Americans', and I don't just mean those who are chronologically old, but people who were born into the old America and who grew up in it, who still remember it and carry it within.

Some Mexican official made a boasting statement a few years ago, to the effect that ''where there are Mexicans, there is Mexico." Well, there are probably several millions more Mexicans here than when he made that statement, and sadly, too much of our country is in fact part of Mexico, if not yet by law.

But where there are old Americans, there is old America.
Some of my Southron brothers and sisters might wonder why I still harbor affection for this country and its real people. They believe the North is beyond redemption, and sadly much of it may be. But the same might be said of our beloved South, including Texas. Think of this: Nashville, home of that most American of music forms, country music, is now colonized by Kurds, with the largest Kurdish ''community'' outside Iraq. There are now Third World colonies in parts of the South that never saw much immigration since my Jamestown ancestors settled there. Think of that. The South is also less Southern since the influx of so many outlanders.

We're in dire straits, no doubt, but where there are true Southrons, the South lives on.
The people make the nation. And we're not finished yet. God will have the last word about that.
Not the drunk-with-power globalists and the leftist lunatics.

And again, as I always say, a majority never drives important change. The inert 'majority' never leads the way; they look to be led by a dedicated and focused few, the 'remnant' which holds out against the siege.
A few people generally make history. Will it be the people who are manically remaking our world to their liking? Only if the remnant succumbs to fatalism.